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Segregation 2015

   

By Sevgi Fernandez

As I look at the state of our country and the racial divide I can’t say I’m surprised. In fact, although formal segregation hasn’t been at play in many years, racism has never left and it plays out in our schools everyday.

With the majority of students in k-12 public schools being of color and the majority of the teachers in these schools being white, the racial biases the teachers hold are cause for great concern. Aside from parents, one could argue that teachers are the next most influential people in our children’s lives. They lay the foundation for how our young people view education and what they are capable of becoming in the future. They are pivotal in how far reaching our children’s dreams will be.  

Institutional racism is a pervasive machine that begins to work on a child’s sense of self worth the moment they begin school. It’s a machine that’s been well oiled and perfected over the years.  With knowledge comes power and one need only look at the history of racial oppression in this country to see why the white dominant society would want to create and perpetuate a system that makes getting a quality education equal to that of their own extremely difficult to attain for people of color.  

“So while our education system is highly problematic—it is neither fair nor equal—it’s not broken. It does exactly what it was deliberately built to do.” C. Royal

If we look back at the history of education in the U.S., we can clearly see how the systematic approach to keep people of color uneducated began.

  
“Most White Southern slaveholders were adamantly opposed to the education of their slaves because they feared an educated slave population would threaten their authority.”H.A. Williams, 2005

Although many slaves and free Africans found ways to self teach and there were whites who aided them in their education, there was a significant amount of time in which there were few schools available to them.
In the 1600-1700’s there was a steady increase in schools and educational options for blacks yet by the early 1800’s leading up to the imancipation proclamation, many southern states outlawed the education of blacks both free and slaves. These laws had steep penalties for anyone caught aiding in the education of blacks as well.

In the interest of keeping this an article and not having it turn into a book, I’m go to skip around a bit. So let’s fast forward to 1954 and Brown vs The Board of Education. On May 17, the U.S. Supreme Court outlawed racial segregation in schools. Did that change things? Yes, absolutely. Unfortunately the statistics aren’t all one would have hoped. 

 

 
It’s telling that we live in a country where it took a Supreme Court order to desegregate our schools. What’s even more abhorrent is the fact that since over 200 school districts (mostly in the south) were released from this court order, many quickly returned to their segregated ways.    


“But while segregation as it is practiced today may be different than it was 60 years ago, it is no less pernicious: in Tuscaloosa and elsewhere, it involves the removal and isolation of poor black and Latino students, in particular, from everyone else. In Tuscaloosa today, nearly one in three black students attends a school that looks as if Brown v. Board of Education never happened.” (N.H. Jones)

The effects of this systematic racism are apparent in the African American community across the country, wherever you look. It’s in the hopelessness of our youth, in the violence within our communities and at the hands of the police. It’s in the educational system that is set up to fail our kids and the healthcare system that is either unattainable or so discriminatory many fear ever seeking out the care they need.  Rather than educating and nourishing the minds of our young people of color, the system is feeding the school to prison pipeline .

“Young Black men — across the board — score below their counterparts in other racial and ethnic groups when it comes to graduation rates, literacy rates and college preparedness. And many African American men, in turn, are virtually locked out of employment and are filling up the nation’s prisons in disproportionate numbers.” (J. Daniels)  
  

“Nearly 75 percent of imprisonment spending happens at the state level, where dollars are drawn from a general fund that is meant to pay for a range of public needs, including health care, housing, public assistance, and education.” S. Hawkins

 So when people wonder what all the protests are about, what black people are so upset about, just open your eyes!!!! Why are our youth rioting??!!! It’s not just about police brutality, it goes much deeper.  Look at the reality these young people face everyday. Poor quality education, teachers who don’t understand them culturally, who don’t believe in them, who tell them what they cannot be.  

“When black teachers and white teachers are asked to sum up black high school students’ potential, white teachers are much less likely to see black students as college material. And that’s true even when they’re discussing the same students.” L. Nelson

They face a school system that has been designed for whites to excel. A system that is funneling our children of color into prisons at epic proportions.  A curriculum that is culturally irrelevant to a huge percentage of those it’s there to teach. A system that is funneling money into prisons while subsequently starving the programs that could keep our kids out of prison. They are insuring the continuance of the cycles of poverty, illiteracy and hopelessness. 
This system is purposeful. There have been plenty of studies that have examined why the system is failing African American children and plenty that have offered solutions, yet here we are.

For example, the “No Child Left Behind” law that instituted mandatory testing with the purpose of accountability, has failed miserably. The number of African American drop outs increased by 10% in its first 10 years. One study shows only 50% of the nations girls of African American, Hispanic, and Native American descent are actually graduating high school. The statistics for boys are much lower.                   W.B. Harvey 

Why?

  1. The curriculum is designed by whites for whites.
  2. The testing is based on this curriculum and once again was designed by whites for whites.
  3. Schools are concerned with test scores only, not the child, not the education
  4. Most of our urban public schools are non-white and subsequently underfunded
  5. Many African American children are misinterpreted and mislabeled due to racial stereotyping 
  6. These children feel the effects of this stereotyping and begin to feel dumb because they are labeled dumb

If we examine this list, we can see why our African American youth are in the state they are in.  I was fortunate to sit on the thesis committee of an incredible educator, Chilufiya Safaa, she summed up what these children are facing with heart piercing accuracy:

The children act out; they take on the labels of being dumb or trouble. They then become vulnerable to the streets, jail, and death.  They start fighting each other rather than fighting against the stereotypes and the system which is oppressing them.  It becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.”

Wake up folks. We are steadily heading backwards. Racism and segregation are very real and our young and vulnerable are faced with it everyday. We can’t just complain, or close our eyes and pretend it doesn’t exist. It takes critical thinking and community action. What can you commit to do in your community to address these issues and bring about change? If you don’t know here are some places to start:

  
Sources:

  1. Tavis Smiley Reports. EPISODE 5: Too Important to Fail.  Fact Sheet: Outcomes for Young, Black Men.  Tamika Thompson
  2. SELF-TAUGHT, African American Education in Slavery and Freedom. HEATHER ANDREA WILLIAMS. CHAPEL HILL: UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS, 2005. 
  3. http://www.nationalcenter.org/brown.html
  4. The Impact of the Brown v. Board of Education Decision on Postsecondary Participation of African Americans. William B. Harvey, Adia M. Harvey and Mark King. The Journal of Negro Education,Vol. 73, No. 3, Special Issue: Brown v. Board of Education at 50 (Summer, 2004), pp. 328-340
  5. http://m.ourweekly.com/news/2013/oct/03/whats-african-american-literacy-rates/. What’s up with African American literacy rates?Story by David L. Horne, PH.D. 10/3/2013
  6. Racism in K-12 Public Schools: Education Series July 12, 2011,       JessieDaniels,racismhttp://www.racismreview.com/blog/2011/07/12/racism-k-12/
  7. Racism in the classroom: the “soft bigotry of low expectations” is just regular bigotry.  Libby Nelson, August 19, 2015, @libbyanelson libby@vox.com
  8. Nikole Hannah-Jones, ProPublica, April 16, 2014, 11 p.m.
  9. http://m.prospect.org/article/education-vs-incarceration. Steven Hawkins
  10. http://magazine.good.is/articles/our-education-system-isn-t-broken-it-s-designed-to-create-winners-and-losers. Our Education System Isn’t Broken, It’s Designed to Create Winners and Losers. Camika Royal.

Unite Against RacismBreaking Down Walls and Building Community

  
Challenging Racism and Islamophobia

Join us for the second in our three part series Unite Against Racism: Breaking Down Walls and Building Community; Challenging Racism and Islamophobia.Given the growing divide along racial and religious lines in this country and globally, we will focus this seminar on examining where the breakdowns in communication and understanding are occuring specifically between blacks/whites and Muslims/Non-Muslims. Sevgi Fernandez of Together We Stand and Dr. John P. Fernandez of ARMCGlobal, global leaders on racism, sexism and diversity training, will be facilitating. The emphasis will be to create GolbalTREE, Trust, Respect, Empathy, Ethics, through a multifaceted approach using individual and group exercises.

Please RSVP to Diversewc@gmail.com, we will be emailing attendees an exercise to do prior to the workshop.
Register now, space is limited!!!

Unite Against Racism: Breaking Down Walls and Building Community

When

Saturday, Jan. 23rd 2016 at 2:30-5:30pm

Where

2930 Shattuck Avenue Berkeley, CA
Agenda
Welcome – Introductions

Individual – Group Exercises

Break

Documentary

Group discussion

Closing – personal commitments to change

Western Institute for Social Research

Since 1975 WISR, the Western Institute for Social Research, has been a multicultural academic institution of higher learning devoted to social change and community improvement. WISR, is a community-based, globally connected degree granting institution of higher learning. WISR’s students can earn Bachelor’s, Master’s and Doctoral degrees in a variety of disciplines related to community improvement and leadership, educational innovation, counseling psychology, and progressive social change.

2930 Shattuck Avenue, Berkeley, CA, United States Mail@wisr.edu 510 655-2830 wisr.edu

Advanced Reaearch Management Consultants

Advanced Research Management Consultants Global, LLC– is a full service human resources, executive coaching, diversity, mentoring, marketing, e-learning and video production firm. We specialize in assisting organizations realize their competitive advantage on a local and global scale.

ARMC Global develops and delivers seminars in such areas as leadership, global virtual teams, teambuilding, communications, generation gap, GLBT (gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender), work and life balance, cultural clashes, conflict resolution, Proactive Inclusion® and GlobalTREE℠ (Trust, Respect, Empathy, and Ethics).

701 West Allens Lane, Philadelphia, PA, United States JPF@Globaltree.com 215 247-4547 armcglobal.com

Sevgi Fernandez – Together We Stand – Diverse World Coaching

Diverse World Coaching specializes in working with blended, cross-cultural and interracial families as well as individuals struggling with racial identity formation, anxiety and depression.

Together We Stand advocates for victims of racism, discrimination and police brutality across the country. We are developing a youth leadership academy that will train participants to become social change agents and prepare them to enter college with an excellent foundation in social justice advocacy.

Together We Stand also offers the following workshops:

Racism and White Privilege

Parenting Mixed Race Children: Understanding their Racial Identity Development 

Navigating the Blended Family

Youth Empowerment through Community Action

Richmond, CA, United States diversewc@gmail.com

Howard Stern Calls For Israel To “Wipe Palestinians Off The Face Of The Earth”

Posted by: Mary Carmel Dr. David Duke. Phd Howard Stern calls for Israel to “wipe Palestinians off the face of the earth” — That’s ok, right? Commentary —This article from the Times of Israel says it all about the double standard whereby Jewish privilege allows Howard Stern to call for the genocide of an entire […]

https://wikkorg.wordpress.com/2015/10/11/howard-stern-calls-for-israel-to-wipe-palestinians-off-the-face-of-the-earth/

HERE ARE 10 WARNINGS MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. GAVE BLACK PEOPLE ABOUT WHITE PEOPLE

  

After Martin Luther King Jr.’s death, he was immediately homogenized by people seeking to co-opt his legacy. King was, however, an icon who thought deeply about the issues that plagued the black community and the role white America had played to bring about those circumstances. Listed below are some of the criticisms King made of white America, may of which still feel relevant today.

1.) White People Never Truly Sought an End to Discrimination
With Selma and the Voting Rights Act one phase of development in the civil rights revolution came to an end. A new phase opened, but few observers realized it or were prepared for its implications. Forthe vast majority of white Americans, the past decade—the first phase—had been a struggle to treat the Negro with a degree of decency, not of equality. White America was ready to demand that the Negro should be spared the lash of brutality and coarse degradation, but it had never been truly committed to helping him out of poverty, exploitation or all forms of discrimination.
2.) White People Will Abandon You

When Negroes looked for the second phase, the realization of equality, they found that many of their white allies had quietly disappeared.
3.) Never Take White People at Their Word

The Negroes of America had taken the President, the press and the pulpit at their word when they spoke in broad terms of freedom and justice. But the absence of brutality and unregenerate evil is not the presence of justice. To stay murder is not the same thing as to ordain brotherhood. The word was broken, and the free-running expectations of the Negro crashed into the stone walls of white resistance.

4.) White People Believe in a Fantasy World

The majority of white Americans sincerely committed to justice for the Negro. They believe that American society is essentially hospitable to fair play and to steady growth toward a middle-class Utopia embodying racial harmony. But unfortunately this is a fantasy of self-deception and comfortable vanity. Overwhelmingly Americais still struggling with irresolution and contradictions.
5.) White People Are Bonded to the Status Quo

As the nation passes from opposing ex-tremist behavior to the deeper and more pervasive elements of equality, white America rearms its bonds to the statusquo. It had contemplated comfortably hugging the shorelinebut now fears that the winds of change are blowing it outto sea.

6.) White People Want Equality for Blacks, So Long as It Doesn’t Cost Them Anything

The practical cost of change for the nation up to this point has been cheap. The limited reforms have been obtained at bargain rates. There are no expenses, and no taxes are required, for Negroes to share lunch counters, libraries, parks, hotels and other facilities with whites.
7.) White People Don’t Even Understand What Equality Means

But most whites in America in 1967, including many persons of goodwill, proceed from a premise that equality is a loose expression for improvement.
8.) White America Really Only Seeks to Hide Inequality, Not Fix It

White America is not even psychologically organized to close the gap—essentially it seeks only to make it less painful and less obvious but in most respects to retain it.
9.) White People Don’t Believe They Have Anything to Learn

Whites, it must frankly be said, are not putting in a similar mass effort to reeducate themselves out of their racial ignorance. It is an aspect of their sense of superiority that the white people of America believe they have so little to learn.
10.) Whites Believe Blacks Have Come Far Enough

He remembers that with each modest advance the white population promptly raises the argument that the Negro has come far enough. Each step forward accents an ever-present tendency to backlash.
Sources

All of Martin Luther King’s quotes were taken from Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? (King Legacy)

http://blacklistory.com/2014/06/here-are-10-warnings-martin-luther-king-jr-gives-black-people-about-white-people/

Black Lives Matter: Brazilian Police Kill Citizens 6 Times More Than U.S.

  

By Chelcee Johns | August 31, 2015

One protestor holds a sign reading “I support the 3rd international march against the genocide of Black people.” Facebook.com/ReajaOuSeraMorto

Last Monday, over 5,000 Brazilians took to the streets of Salvador da Bahia to protest the deaths of unarmed Black people by police officers. Salvador da Bahi, the center of Afro-Brazilian culture, is feeling many of the pains endured by Blacks in America as Brazilian police have killed an average of six people per day between 2009 and 2013. Much like the U.S., these victims are disproportionately Black.

Over the past five years, Brazilian police have killed close to as many citizens as U.S. police have in the past 30 years. Last week’s protest is part of a larger movement in Brazil, “Reaja ou SeráMorto,” which translates to “React or Die,” and has many of the same concerns as America’s Black Lives Matter movement.
“This country loves our Black culture, our music, our bodies, but hates the fact we still exist as the majority,” one 26-year-old woman participating in the protest told Refinery29. “Salvador is the front line of the war against African people in Brazil. My people built this city — this country — through slavery. We will not be silent. Black lives have value; Africans all over the diaspora want to live.”

The New York Times reported at least 2,212 Brazilians were killed by the police in 2013. This number could be greater, but unfortunately not all states within the country record just how many deaths occur at the hands of police.

“Of course, the sense of outrage would be different if these victims were boys with blond hair and blue eyes who lived in rich areas, but they were not,” Antônio Carlos Costa told the Times after a 10-year-old was killed by police and his mother threatened at gunpoint. Costa is a Presbyterian pastor and works to keep track of how many children under 14 are killed by the police.

One human rights attorney who volunteers with the movement said Brazil has it far worse than America and the numbers attest to this. The Reaja ou Será Morto movement has existed for the past 10 years, but only recently have they taken to the streets to create large protests.

“When the police invade your community, your home, bash in your door, and slaughter a young family member before your eyes, it sets terror and a river of tears, and endless pain, a pain that lives after the dead are buried… We are calling this a genocide,” said one 24-year-old Afro-Brazilian woman at Monday’s protest.
Blacks in Brazil are no longer keeping quiet as police terrorize their communities, even in the face of possible death. A protest of last week’s magnitude isn’t widespread in Brazil due to the fact police often threaten the lives of organizers. Reaja ou Será Morto organizers have received death threats on their phones and social media pages and even unwarranted home visits from police.
But Reaja ou Será Morto is saying the time is now for justice in their country.
“We are not celebrating the dead; people are here celebrating life. The life of our children, to guarantee they will wake up every day and not worry about dying,” another protestor contended.

Source: Madamenoire.com

Donald Trump Doesn’t Correct Anti-Muslim Supporter Asking For Plan To “Get Rid” Of Muslims In U.S.

At a campaign rally Thursday, a supporter stated the president wasn’t American, then went on to ask Trump how to “get rid” of Muslims.

http://blackamericaweb.com/2015/09/20/donald-trump-doesnt-correct-anti-muslim-supporter-asking-for-plan-to-get-rid-of-muslims-in-u-s/

Civil Rights Warriors

 I want to take a moment to say thank you to ALL of the people across the country who are taking it upon themselves to record and document police brutality. We are seeing a new story everyday in which officers are assaulting and even killing citizens. Black citizens. Do civil rights even exist anymore? When a boy can be beaten for jaywalking, a woman can be brutalized on a bus for petty theft, I’d say no.

  
We are sending a VERY CLEAR MESSAGE that we will not just sit by. We will document and we will make sure they are held accountable.

To all the Civil Rights Warriors who are everyday people saying “NO MORE!”, I thank you!!!!

  

Workshop: Unite Against Racism

  
Unite Against Racism

Breaking Down Walls and Building Community

It Begins and Ends With Us!!

Join me for the first in a 3 part documentary/discussion series examining and dismantling Racism. Whites and People of Color see race from radically different perspectives. We will explore our individual biases and how they impact our choices and impact our community. Through individual, group and interactive exercises we will increase understanding transforming fear into knowledge and that knowledge into the power we need to eradicate racism and oppression. It’s imperative that all People of Color come together as ONE community to challenge the system of racism and oppression that this country has been built upon. It’s also crucial that our white allies join in this movement. These seminars are meant for everyone, regardless of your racial, socio/economic, religious or political background. You don’t even have to agree with the movement. What’s essential is that we dialogue face to face in a respectful environment where we can build understanding.

Saturday, Nov. 7th, 2:30-5:30pm

2930 Shattuck Avenue, Suite 300 Berkeley

AGENDA

  • Welcome
  • Documentary: The Conversation 
  • White People on Race
  • My Black Son
  • Growing up Black
  • Individual and Group Exercises
  • Discussion: We will analyze the polarization between blacks and whites in the U.S., with an in depth look at the raw realities on both sides. 

Diverse World Coaching
Facebook @SevgiCoach

El Cerrito, CA, United States 

diversewc@gmail.com 

1(628)333-9830

diverseworldcoaching.wordpress.com

RSVP

Space is Limited! It is essential you RSVP by phone or by sending me an email. Please leave Name/Email and the number of people you would like to bring.

Thank You!!!!!

  

Police Violence Kills a Man Who Went to Hospital for Help!

The following is the statement and the ipetition made by Alan’s family and colleagues:

  

“We stand, now, with shaken hearts and rooted conviction, to speak our collective outrage for Alan Christopher Pean, a 26 year old who was inexcusably shot in the chest by a police officer, while seeking care as a patient at St Joseph’s Medical Center.
Personally, we know Alan as a brother, a friend, a son, a supporter, a man marked by tender kindness, quiet acts of sacrifice, humor, self-reflection, and patience.
Personally, we stand in outrage for every time he is referred to as “combative” without sub-clause or context, we stand in outrage for every time he is called a “suspect” instead of a patient, we stand in outrage for every time he, one empty-handed, help-seeking man, is painted as a threat to two officers, able bodied and armed, in a hospital.
Professionally, we have been trained in truth seeking and healing. As doctors and medical students, as nurses and care partners, we are trained in how to safely restrain and tranquilize patients, no matter how aggressive, or irritable, or anxious, or threatening they may be. Never is it appropriate or warranted for a patient to be tazed, never is it appropriate for a patient to be struck, never, never, never is it appropriate for a patient seeking care, to have their life threatened in our arms.
Personally and professionally, we are shaken by the reality of this epidemic of police brutality, in which no one– no son of a doctor, no college student, no tender-hearted soul of color remains immune. We stand with shaken hearts and rooted conviction, to speak our collective outrage for Alan Christopher Pean, our gentle friend, a 26 year old who was inexcusably shot in the chest by a police officer, while seeking care as a patient.”
___
On August 27th, 2015, Alan Christopher Pean, a 26-year-old patient seeking care at St. Joseph’s Medical Center, was shot in the chest with a gun by hospital security. As members of the medical community, friends of Alan and his family, it is impossible for us to remain silent on this injustice and the disgraceful violations of medical, legal, and moral ethics involved in his care. We, the medical community, have failed Alan.
By multiple reports, Alan drove himself to the St. Joseph ED late Wednesday night, August 26th. He believed that a hospital was a place he could seek safe haven and get treatment. He was in such dire straits that he could barely get to the hospital without grazing other parked vehicles. Alan presented to the ED complaining of new-onset, intense anxiety and general disorientation. He was admitted to the hospital to assess his injuries from his minor MVA. The next morning (August 27th), Alan’s parents flew from Mcallen, TX to Houston. They visited Alan at the hospital and, upon interacting with their son, they were struck by his unfamiliar behavior, speech, and general disorientation. They communicated their observations with the personnel and implored hospital personnel to obtain a psychiatric evaluation. At the very least, as the patient’s surrogate decision makers, they desired to speak with Alan’s physician. Both requests were denied.
St Joseph’s personnel communicated that they would, instead of integrating crucial corroborative provided by Alan’s parents (one who is a board-certified physician in his own right), discharge the patient against his and his family’s wishes. While assessing a previously unknown patient’s mental status can be difficult, one of its most crucial, clinically sound aspects is the corroboration of evidence by friends and family. The physicians and ancillary staff had ample access to such data and either refused to appropriately integrate said data into their evaluation or simply did not recognize its utmost importance. Both are undeniable acts of medical negligence.
Alan’s parents were devastated that they were so dismissed by the hospital staff who were supposed to be taking care of their son. While discussing where to transfer Alan’s care, they returned to the hospital. They were subsequently informed that, far from being safe to discharge home, Alan had been accosted and shot by security personnel.
Alan was–it cannot be reiterated enough–an admitted patient on St Joseph’s eighth floor. In the midst of a mental health crisis, he was confused, frightened, and vulnerable. In short, he was–and still is–a patient. Alan had recently moved to Houston to study for the GRE, continue to take classes, and apply for graduate school. He hopes to join our medical community and become a physician’s assistant. At this point, we can only pray that our friend Alan even has the opportunity to hope for a future.
Instead of offering him the best medical care for a patient experiencing one of his life’s true moments of crisis, St. Joseph’s medical professionals enabled their security division to commit an act of violence against one of their patients. Anyone who has worked in a hospital setting for any period of time is aware of the protocols and medical resources -pharmacological and nonpharmacological–at its disposal to manage any patient’s agitated or combative behavior non-violently. There are multiple methods of intervention and amelioration to protect a disoriented patient from hurting himself or others. Utilizing a gun is not an option. Utilizing a gun against a patient is anathema to our professional standards. There is absolutely zero indication for gun violence in a healthcare setting. This is an indictment, not only on the officers in question, but how rational and compassionate medical care was delivered overall.
Furthermore, the police department and St. Joseph’s Medical Center continued to infringe upon its mission to serve the well-being of its patients. The hospital barred Alan’s family from seeing Alan for nearly 48 hours–48 hours after being shot on a hospital floor. They barred a father from seeing his son. They barred a mother from seeing her child. They barred two brothers from seeing their brother. They were limited to “10 minute visits” per day and disallowed physical contact. These strict rules are those employed in prisons. Not in places of healing. This is abuse of a patient and his family in every physical and emotional way imaginable. Alan’s parents have been interrogated relentlessly as to whether Alan has a criminal record or has ever been to jail. (By the way, he has not.) The Peans are aghast at their treatment by fellow medical professionals.
Finally, as Alan lay intubated in the ICU, he was charged with two counts of aggravated assault against a public servant. Bail set. A young man who rightfully sought treatment as a patient for an acute mental crisis was shot under the care of a hospital and is now a criminal. With a bullet hole in his chest.
The legal concerns are irrelevant to the true tragedy at hand. Alan’s family simply desires that Alan get better. They wish to physically see and hold their boy. They desire to tell him that they love him and tell him not to be afraid.
Primum non nocere.
-8/29/15 UPDATE: Alan was extubated, obviously in pain, but talking. The first thing he asked his family was, “is anyone else hurt?”
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-20X4p9FVts
-9/3/15 UPDATE: 7 days after being shot, Alan is out of the hospital, walking and talking with minimal pain. He is grateful for the miracle allowing him to have survived and encourages everyone to put away the anger, address the many issues at play in his story, and learn from this so it NEVER happens again.
____
Momentum is a powerful thing so please take a second to sign today. Thank you for sending your thoughts and prayers to the Pean family. Please do NOT donate monetarily (no option to delete this feature).
While we appreciate your support in any form, we encourage you to sign and complete the additional fields identifying your role in the healthcare community. Please add your title in the box of name entry i.e. [John Doe, MD] 

Below is the actual link to the petition. I ask that you sign it and share this story because it’s clear we much force action be taken. This happens to frequently and is happening in increasing numbers. Police violence is unacceptable 
  http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/AlanPean

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